Today was a good day. #beach #jerseyshore #boardwalk #blueskies

Today was a good day. #beach #jerseyshore #boardwalk #blueskies

1/6/2013 . 0 notes . Reblog
Last box to pack before bed. #pointe #ballet #freed

Last box to pack before bed. #pointe #ballet #freed

29/5/2013 . 4 notes . Reblog
miss this

miss this

16/2/2013 . 0 notes . Reblog
life:

So, apparently, this is what a genius looks like.
As LIFE noted in a March 1948 feature on the so called “genius school”:

The school they go to is P.S. 600, part of New York’s public-school system and the only institution in the U.S. devoted entirely to the teaching and study of gifted children. It is held in a wing of the college’s main building, in whose long corridors the bright little kids from 3 to 11 years old like to stop off for between-class chats.


Offhand, young geniuses would seem to present no immediate problems because they are usually bigger, healthier and even happier than average children. However, an educational problem exists simply because they are too bright for their age. If they are promoted rapidly through school on the basis of their studies they will end up as social misfits, unable to enjoy the society of children their own age. On the other hand, if they are held back with their own age group, their quick minds are apt to stagnate.


Hunter children know they are smart, but they are more humble than cocky about their intelligence…. [A]lthough their interest are advanced, their plans for the future have a refreshing normality. There is a 9-year-old who wants to be a fur trapper, an 8-year-old who wants to be a babysitter and a 7-year-old who wants to be president of the Coca-Cola Company.

Here, LIFE.com presents photos from the feature in the magazine, as well as pictures that never ran in LIFE.

life:

So, apparently, this is what a genius looks like.

As LIFE noted in a March 1948 feature on the so called “genius school”:

The school they go to is P.S. 600, part of New York’s public-school system and the only institution in the U.S. devoted entirely to the teaching and study of gifted children. It is held in a wing of the college’s main building, in whose long corridors the bright little kids from 3 to 11 years old like to stop off for between-class chats.

Offhand, young geniuses would seem to present no immediate problems because they are usually bigger, healthier and even happier than average children. However, an educational problem exists simply because they are too bright for their age. If they are promoted rapidly through school on the basis of their studies they will end up as social misfits, unable to enjoy the society of children their own age. On the other hand, if they are held back with their own age group, their quick minds are apt to stagnate.

Hunter children know they are smart, but they are more humble than cocky about their intelligence…. [A]lthough their interest are advanced, their plans for the future have a refreshing normality. There is a 9-year-old who wants to be a fur trapper, an 8-year-old who wants to be a babysitter and a 7-year-old who wants to be president of the Coca-Cola Company.

Here, LIFE.com presents photos from the feature in the magazine, as well as pictures that never ran in LIFE.

21/8/2012 . 1,017 notes . Reblog
A Longreads Member Exclusive: The Power of a Crisis

longreads:

Last year we introduced the Longreads Membership as an optional way for you to support our service. And it’s because of our members that we’re still here today. Thank you again for all your support.

Today we’re introducing something new for our Longreads Members: Exclusive access to stories that aren’t available anywhere else on the web, produced by the best publishers and writers in the world. We’re thrilled to partner with Random House and New York Times writer Charles Duhigg in presenting our first Longreads Exclusive Pick, “The Power of a Crisis,” a full chapter from Duhigg’s bestselling book The Power of Habit.

We hope to send more exclusives to you in the future. We won’t send them every week, but when we do, you’ll be sure that these exclusives come with our highest recommendation. 

One other perk to being a member is that you’ll have the chance to recommend future Longreads Member exclusives. Tell us what you want to share with your fellow members (it can be a story, an excerpt, or something completely different), and if we like it too, we’ll find it and feature both you and your pick. Send us your suggestions at exclusives@longreads.com.

You can read an excerpt of our first exclusive here.

21/8/2012 . 8 notes . Reblog
retrogasm:

Baby Marilyn

retrogasm:

Baby Marilyn

17/7/2012 . 216 notes . Reblog

beautifail:

citruscandy:

so painting with a pigeon is a lot harder than it sounds

I think I stumbled upon the weird side of the internet again ????????

17/7/2012 . 14,063 notes . Reblog

We all long to escape our own subjectivity. That’s what art can do, give us a glimpse of ourselves connected with every human, now and forever, our disconnected, lonely terms escaped for a moment. it offers the consolation of recognition, no small thing. But what the televised bombardment of violent events did to me was completely different. I didn’t overcome my subjectivity; rather, my person got stretched to include the whole world, stretched to a breaking point. I became pervious, bruised and annihilated. That’s what it feels like, this debilitating emotional engagement—annihilation, not affirmation.

I finally made myself fall into bed.


Dana Spiotta, Stone Arabia
17/7/2012 . 0 notes . Reblog
One result of social media is the mirror effect: from posting on Facebook, sharing videos and photographs, and placing thoughts in the concrete form of writing (even if just in the casual mode of texts or posts), kids see themselves from the outside as no other generation ever has. The surveillance they conduct is also on themselves, and their crafting of a persona implies a peculiarly intense self-awareness (though not an improved vocabulary in which to think it through).
Child Rearing in the Age of Social Media : The New Yorker
29/6/2012 . 0 notes . Reblog
Another sunset (sans filter) (Taken with Instagram at Captiva Island)

Another sunset (sans filter) (Taken with Instagram at Captiva Island)

15/3/2012 . 0 notes . Reblog